Who is Claude Shannon? Screening of the movie ‘The Bit Player’!

Filed under Academic, Events on January 27, 2020.
Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering would be screening the movie ‘The Bit Player’ based on the life and works of Claude Shannon, the father of information theory. The movie will be screened on Monday, February 3rd from 3 pm to 5 pm at the Reitz Union Auditorium. There is no registration required and the entry is free.
In a blockbuster paper in 1948, Claude Shannon introduced the world to the “bit” and laid the foundation for the information age. The impact would be incredibly far reaching, influencing such diverse fields as communication, linguistics, genetics, computing, cryptography, neuroscience, artificial intelligence and cosmology. Shannon also constructed a mathematical theory of juggling, rode unicycles, wrote the first paper on computer chess and built a flaming trumpet! The Bit Player, directed by Mark Levinson (Particle Fever), combines interviews with leading scientists, archival film, inventive animation and compelling commentary from Shannon himself to tell the story of an overlooked genius who revolutionized the world, but never lost his childlike curiosity.

Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering would be screening the movie ‘The Bit Player’ based on the life and works of Claude Shannon, the father of information theory. The movie will be screened on Monday, February 3 from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Reitz Union Auditorium. There is no registration required and the entry is free.

In a blockbuster paper in 1948, Claude Shannon introduced the world to the “bit” and laid the foundation for the information age. The impact would be incredibly far reaching, influencing such diverse fields as communication, linguistics, genetics, computing, cryptography, neuroscience, artificial intelligence and cosmology. Shannon also constructed a mathematical theory of juggling, rode unicycles, wrote the first paper on computer chess and built a flaming trumpet! The Bit Player, directed by Mark Levinson (Particle Fever), combines interviews with leading scientists, archival film, inventive animation and compelling commentary from Shannon himself to tell the story of an overlooked genius who revolutionized the world, but never lost his childlike curiosity.